Pikliz – Haitian Pickled Pepper Condiment

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Last Updated on November 13, 2019 by Chef Mireille

Pikliz – Haitian Pickled Pepper Condiment is a staple pantry item in every household if you’re Haitian. If you like spicy food, you will love this condiment!

Pikliz is how we add some heat and spice to anything we are preparing. Here are some delicious Haitian Recipes you can enhance with a little pikliz.

Pikliz - Haitian Pickled Pepper Condiment

After I made Banane Peze and Sauce Pois a few months ago, I said I would be giving you some more Haitian recipes to represent that half of me that is virtually not represented at all on this blog.  To that end, before I can get to some of the delicious food recipes, I am showing you this basic condiment that is used on just about everything we eat.

Haitians have two ways of spicing up food – Sos di Malice and Pikliz. A Haitian table is empty without a small bowl of pikliz. You just need a few drops of the pickle juice to spice up an entire plate of food.

A jar of pikliz is found in the kitchen cabinet of every Haitian household.  The vinegar preserves the vegetables so that it is not necessary to refrigerate it. The longer it is in the cabinet, the spicier it is going to get.

Some people slice up the vegetables, while others grate the vegetables. There is no one correct way to make it. It is simply a matter of preference and I have made it both ways.

Hot Habanero peppers, what we call Scotch Bonnet in the Caribbean, are the staple of this condiment.

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This is a quick and easy way to enjoy a little bit of Haitian culture on your plate!

Use a little on any plate of food or use it as a side condiment with Haitian Pate – Salted Cod Pastries!

Pate LR Pikliz

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Pikliz – Haitian Pickled Pepper Condiment

Haitian Pickled Pepper condiment is perfect for spicy food lovers
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Condiments
Cuisine: Haitian
Servings: 24
Calories: 8.2kcal

Ingredients

  • 6 Scotch Bonnet peppers stems removed and quartered
  • 12 black peppercorns
  • 3 cloves
  • 3 cups white vinegar
  • 3/4 cup cabbage shredded
  • 1/2 large carrot sliced or grated
  • 1/2 bell pepper cut into strips

Instructions

  • Place all ingredients in a glass jar.
  • After 1 week, your picklese is ready.  The vinegar will soften the vegetables.  The vinegar will also be very spicy at this point.  About 1/4 teaspoon and maybe a piece of pickled vegetable or two is used  on an entire plate of food when the picklese is first made.

Nutrition

Calories: 8.2kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.64g | Protein: 0.11g | Fat: 0.03g | Saturated Fat: 0.01g | Sodium: 2.36mg | Fiber: 0.25g | Sugar: 0.32g
Did you try this recipe? Leave a comment below.Please follow me on Instagram @chefmireille or tag me #chefmireille with your pics! I’d love to share them!

It can be stored in the kitchen cabinet for several months.  The vinegar will continue to get stronger as the months go by and you will continually need to use less and less so that a few drops for a plate of food is all that is needed a few months later.

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About Chef Mireille

CHEF MIREILLE - AUTHOR, RECIPE DEVELOPER AND PHOTOGRAPHER FOR Global Kitchen Travels
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Chef Mireille is a NYC based freelance chef instructor and food photographer. Due to her very diverse family background, she was able to travel and learn about global cultures and flavors from a young age. Her passion for culture, cooking, history and education had made her an expert on developing traditional globally inspired recipes & delicious fusion cuisine.
Her extensive travel history provides a plethora of background information and Travel Tips!

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Comments

    • Chef Mireille

      really – I have a cousin who lives in Chicago and she finds them. Habanero’s are almost the same. Use them if you cannot find the Scotch Bonnet. I use them synonymously.

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