Strawberry Hibiscus Ice Cream

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Last Updated on July 18, 2015 by Chef Mireille

Strawberry Ice Cream



Blogging Marathon #29
Theme: Cookbook Recipes

I went to the library last week to do some research on a project and of course, I found myself in the cookbook section. The unusual title caught my attention – Purple Citrus and Sweet Perfume. I fell in love with this cookbook featuring the cuisine of the Eastern Mediterranean. The author, Silvena Rowe, is a UK based chef born in Bulgaria with a Turkish father. The book includes many recipes of Turkish or Syrian origin, utilizing edible flowers like rose, nasurtium, lavender, chamomile and hibiscus. With unique recipes like Beet Falafel, Pumpkin Hummus and Lemon Balm & Chamomile Creme Brulee, you can be sure the book came home with me.

For today’s recipe, the two required ingredients from Srivalli’s Cookbook Recipe ingredient list are strawberries and milk. In the middle of summer, who doesn’t like a cooling bowl of strawberry ice cream?

Strawberry Hibiscus Ice Cream
from Silvena Rowe’s Purple Citrus and Sweet Perfume

Serves 6 
Ingredients:
1 3/4 cups heavy cream
1 cup milk
1 tablespoon dried hibiscus
2 eggs
2/3 cup sugar
11 oz. strawberries, hulled and chopped

In a saucepan, combine the cream, milk and hibiscus. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Turn off heat and leave for 15 minutes for the hibiscus flavor to infuse the milk. Strain and discard the flowers.

Whisk the eggs until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Slowly add the sugar, while beating constantly for another minute. Add the strained cream-milk combo and mix well. Add strawberries and mix until just combined.
Transfer to an ice cream maker and churn, according to your ice cream maker instructions. Alternatively, transfer to a plastic container, cover and place in the freezer.

Mix every 1/2 hour for 4 hours. Freeze for at least another 2 hours, but preferably overnight.

Strawberry ice cream that’s the perfect amount of sweetness with floral undertones. Now don’t you just want to grab a spoon?

Hibiscus Ice Cream

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM#29

See also  Kuih Dadar - Bujang Dalam Selimut - Asian Stuffed Pandan Crepes for #BreadBakers

…linking to Recipe Junction’s Summer Fruits

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Chef Mireille

Thank you for sharing!

About Chef Mireille

CHEF MIREILLE - AUTHOR, RECIPE DEVELOPER AND PHOTOGRAPHER FOR Global Kitchen Travels
***
Chef Mireille is a NYC based freelance chef instructor and food photographer. Due to her very diverse family background, she was able to travel and learn about global cultures and flavors from a young age. Her passion for culture, cooking, history and education had made her an expert on developing traditional globally inspired recipes & delicious fusion cuisine.
Her extensive travel history provides a plethora of background information and Travel Tips!

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Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Foodiliciousnan

    Sounds so flavorful! I never knew hibiscus had any culinary usage. I must find out if they can be home dried. There's lots of hibiscus around my place. The ice-cream looks absolutely delightful and so does that wonderful bowl that you've servedin out in

    • [email protected]

      yes it is used in cooking. There is a drink we make with it in the Caribbean called sorrel. We boil it with ginger, cinnamon and cloves. Then strain it, add sugar and chill. It's one of my all time favorite beverages. and I have seen Punjabi recipe where they make sharbat with it.

  2. Usha

    I never cooked with hibiscus. How did it taste? I can smell the flavor though. When growing up my mom use to cook hibiscus in coconut hair oil and then apply to my hair. The aroma of hibiscus was amazing.

    • [email protected]

      there are a few places you can find it. Kalustyans on lexington ave/28th st. Also Kam Man grocery in Chinatown downstairs where they sell the loose teas. In Caribbean neighborhoods it is sold in markets as sorrel.

  3. Srivalli

    The cookbook sounds exotic and the dish surely looks tempting!..very good choice Mir. You always come out with so much ease!..I seriously have to plan for a tougher nut to crack..LOL..:)

  4. Archana Potdar

    Looks awesome. I love the hibiscus used. my aunt used it to wash my hair so this is a new use 😉 Must tell her.

    Just one question is the milk cold when you strain it? Is it okay to add warm milk in the eggs?

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