Sutlu Irmik Tatlisi – Turkish Semolina Pudding

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Last Updated on November 13, 2019 by Chef Mireille

Turkish Semolina PuddingI always find it so interesting how the same recipe is interpreted in different ways in different countries. I wonder was one influenced by another? Maybe they came in contact with each other via trade? Which was the first country to create the recipe? Or was it much more basic in that each country just figures out on their own the best way to utilize their natural resources of produce and grains. Maybe some day when I am much older and have time to do research..I’ll look into it…I think that would make an interesting book to read, don’t you?

You’ll find several different versions of similar recipes from different countries here on this site…especially if it’s something I really like. There are about 4 different version of polenta already posted here from countries as far reaching as Brazil and Zimbabwe. I love creamy grain based dishes like polenta.

Today’s dish is similar except that when chilled it becomes firm. I have already done the Dutch version of semolina pudding here and the Finnish version here. Now it’s time for the Turkish version. I wonder who created it first?

Turkish Semolina Pudding

(adapted from Hayriye)
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 30 minutes
Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups milk
  • 7 tablespoons sugar
  • 5 tablespoons semolina
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon chopped walnuts (garnish)

In a saucepan, melt butter. Add milk and sugar. Stir and simmer on low heat until bubbles appear on the perimeter.

Add semolina and cook, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 3 minutes.

See also  Assam Tea Brownies

Add vanilla and stir to combine.

Place in a casserole dish or in individual ramekins. Chill for at least 30 minutes.

making

Serve, garnished with the walnuts.

Turkish Pudding -edit

Lovely chilled dessert…especially for summer.

Semolina Pudding -edit

Creamy and luscious.

semolina -edit

Turkish Semolina Pudding
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Sutlu Irmik Tatlisi – Turkish Semolina Pudding

Cook Time10 mins
Total Time40 mins

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups milk
  • 7 tablespoons sugar
  • 5 tablespoons semolina
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon chopped walnuts garnish

Instructions

  • In a saucepan, melt butter. Add milk and sugar. Stir and simmer on low heat until bubbles appear on the perimeter.
  • Add semolina and cook, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 3 minutes.
  • Add vanilla and stir to combine.
  • Place in a casserole dish or in individual ramekins. Chill for at least 30 minutes.
  • Serve, garnished with the walnuts.
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Thank you for sharing!

About Chef Mireille

CHEF MIREILLE - AUTHOR, RECIPE DEVELOPER AND PHOTOGRAPHER FOR Global Kitchen Travels
***
Chef Mireille is a NYC based freelance chef instructor and food photographer. Due to her very diverse family background, she was able to travel and learn about global cultures and flavors from a young age. Her passion for culture, cooking, history and education had made her an expert on developing traditional globally inspired recipes & delicious fusion cuisine.
Her extensive travel history provides a plethora of background information and Travel Tips!

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Comments

  1. Sowmya

    The similarities are amazing…as you would know there is an Indian version of this dish too! And please do write that book, it will be one awesome read. I oils be your research assistant 🙂

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