Amaranth/Dasheen Cauliflower Soup

Thank you for sharing!

Last Updated on May 20, 2020 by Chef Mireille

Dasheen Soup

Calaloo is a common vegetable eaten in the Caribbean. Here in America, you can find it at vegetable markets in Caribbean neighborhoods. I always thought this was a uniquely Caribbean vegetable because I have never seen it referenced in other cuisines.
After doing some research, I learned that this is actually amaranth leaves. Calaloo is the name originating from the West Africans who came to the Caribbean, but the English word is amaranth. Dasheen bush is also sometimes used for calaloo. These are the leaves of the taro root plant.

In recent years, amaranth has become popular in health food circles. However, the grains or the milled flour is usually used. It is still difficult to locate amaranth leaves in a generic or even health food supermarket. It is readily available in Indian supermarkets, who use this green leaf vegetable as well. So take an excursion to a Caribbean or Indian supermarket and make this delicious Indian inspired soup.

One characteristic of South Indian cuisine is the use of podi’s. A podi is a spice powder that consists of lentils and spices. There are many variations. Millagi Podi is a spicy one made with lots of dried red chiles which is quite popular. I used some of this to flavor the soup. Let’s first make the podi.

Millagi Podi (Sesame Chile Spice Powder)

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons chana dal (yellow split peas)
  • 3 tablespoons urad dal (hulled and split black lentils)
  • 3 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 3/4 teaspoon asoefetida
  • 10 dried red chiles
  • 1 teaspoon salt

In a dry skillet, roast chana dal, urad dal, sesame seeds and chiles until fragrant.
In a food procesor, grind with the asoefetida and salt until you have a fine powder.
Store in a glass jar.

Amaranth/Dasheen Cauliflower Soup

Serves 6
Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1 bunch amaranth leaves (or dasheen bush leaves), chopped –  about 3 firmly packed cups
  • 2 cups cauliflower, chopped
  • 6 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons millagi podi
  • 1/4 teaspoon red chile powder (cayenne pepper)
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • salt, to taste

Heat oil. Add onions and garlic and saute for a few minutes until softened.
Add cauliflower and amaranth. Stir for 1 minute. Add water. Boil for 20 minutes.
Remove from heat. Using an immersion blender, puree.
Add cream, podi, cayenne pepper, garam masala, lemon juice and salt. Bring to a boil and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

It may not be the most aesthetically attractive soup, but one spoonful and you’ll quickly disregard that.

Cauliflower Soup

It’s snowing AGAIN right now and I am remembering how good this soup was when I made it a few weeks ago. I am wishing I had all the ingredients at home now so I could make it, but until then I’ll just share it with you.


…linking to Souper Sunday, Fabulous Feast Friday & No Croutons Required

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 Chef Mireille

Thank you for sharing!

About Chef Mireille

CHEF MIREILLE - AUTHOR, RECIPE DEVELOPER AND PHOTOGRAPHER FOR Global Kitchen Travels
***
Chef Mireille is a NYC based freelance chef instructor and food photographer. Due to her very diverse family background, she was able to travel and learn about global cultures and flavors from a young age. Her passion for culture, cooking, history and education had made her an expert on developing traditional globally inspired recipes & delicious fusion cuisine.
Her extensive travel history provides a plethora of background information and Travel Tips!

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Deb in Hawaii

    Interesting–I am going to have to keep my eye out for calaloo/amaranth and give it a try.
    This soup looks thick, warming and delicious–thanks for sharing it with Souper Sundays this week. 😉

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