Red Lentil Kadhi

Thank you for sharing!

Last Updated on April 25, 2022 by Sandra

Red Lentil Curry, Masoor Dal Curry

Today, I am taking you on a journey to Chattisgarh, a state located in Central East India. Like many other Indian states, it was established along linquistic lines. It was formed in 2000 out of 16 Chattisgarhi speaking districts of Madhya Pradesh. It is a landlocked state, bordered on all sides by 6 other states.

Chattisgarh is one of the poorest states of India, with only Bihar and Odisha having lower poverty rates. It also has life expectancy rates, education index rates and standard of living levels well below the national average. Although located in Central India, Chattisgarh has many similarities with the Northeast Seven Sisters, including a large tribal population.

However, it is rich in culture. Chattisgarh tribes are especially known for dance. Many of their traditional dances depict stories from Hindu religious texts, the Ramayan and Mahabharata, as well as other religious themes. Here is one example.

Now let’s take a small glimpse into their cuisine.

Red Lentil Kadhi
(adapted from here)

Serves 4-6
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup red lentils/ masoor dal
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
  • 6 curry leaves
  • 2 dried red chiles
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 2 teaspoon chickpea flour/besan
  • salt, to taste

Bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Add lentils. Cook until tender, about 10 minutes.
In a wok or large skillet, heat oil.
Add mustard seed, curry leaves and chiles. After they stop sizzling and popping, add onion. Saute until softened. Add cooked lentils, turmeric, salt and coriander. Stir to combine.
In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt and the besan. Add this to the lentils and simmer for 5 minutes.

This is a really creamy and luscious dal.

 
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Red Lentil Kadhi

Servings: 4
Calories: 74kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup red lentils/ masoor dal
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
  • 6 curry leaves
  • 2 dried red chiles
  • 1 onion finely chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 2 teaspoon chickpea flour/besan
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  • Bring 4 cups of water to a boil.
  • Add lentils. Cook until tender, about 10 minutes.
  • In a wok or large skillet, heat oil.
  • Add mustard seed, curry leaves and chiles. After they stop sizzling and popping, add onion. Saute until softened.
  • Add cooked lentils, turmeric, salt and coriander. Stir to combine.
  • In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt and the besan.
  • Add this to the lentils and simmer for 5 minutes.

Nutrition

Calories: 74kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 4mg | Sodium: 17mg | Potassium: 123mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 155IU | Vitamin C: 32mg | Calcium: 55mg | Iron: 1mg
Did you try this recipe? Leave a comment below.Please follow me on Instagram @chefmireille or tag me #chefmireille with your pics! I’d love to share them!

Thank you for sharing!

About Chef Mireille

CHEF MIREILLE - AUTHOR, RECIPE DEVELOPER AND PHOTOGRAPHER FOR Global Kitchen Travels
***
Chef Mireille is a NYC based freelance chef instructor and food photographer. Due to her very diverse family background, she was able to travel and learn about global cultures and flavors from a young age. Her passion for culture, cooking, history and education had made her an expert on developing traditional globally inspired recipes & delicious fusion cuisine.
Her extensive travel history provides a plethora of background information and Travel Tips!

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Comments

  1. Suma Gandlur

    Looks yummy and no doubt a nutritious one. It reminds of one greengran kadhi I prepared for one of the BMs. Until then, I had always assumed that beans didn't go into kadhis.

    • Chef Mireille

      Indian food is so regionalized so I totally believe it. I think sometimes its easier for me as an outsider to learn more about Indian food because I am not hindered by family or regional traditional recipes. I approach it from a historical research perspective.

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